Is Nervous Fatigue Affecting You?

Is Nervous Fatigue Affecting You?

In our clinic, we see a lot of patients that have no one specific reason they have tight and sore muscles, joint stiffness and aches, and who are feeling tired and run down. One cause, and something not commonly realised, is nervous fatigue, and we are seeing more of this over the last couple of years. So, let’s talk about what nervous fatigue is, and what can be done to help.

What is Nervous Fatigue?

Nervous fatigue is a type of fatigue caused by excessive emotional stress – think studying or working for long periods without a break, dealing with overwhelming responsibilities over a significant period of time, living with mental health symptoms, and spending emotional and mental energy on worries, stress, and problems. While it isn’t uncommon to feel tired or even exhausted after a particularly mentally draining day, nervous fatigue isn’t something that a good night’s sleep can fix, and can have some rather intense effects.

Elements of Nervous Fatigue

According to Dr Claire Weekes, there are four elements to Nervous Fatigue – Physical, Emotional, Mental, and Spirit. Some people find that they are affected in just the one way, while others are affected in more than one way, and sometimes by all four.

Physical

Muscles rest in a state known as “tone”, a balance between relaxation and contraction. When muscles are held in a tense state, for long periods of time, this delicate balance of “tone” is upset. And this creates a build-up of the chemicals of fatigue, which leads to the aching muscles. Often a sense of muscle weakness follows as well.

Dr Weekes explains that although these bodily reactions are temporary and ultimately unimportant, a sufferer, who doesn’t understand what is going on, can become intensely fearful of these attacks. And this fear of the body’s reaction, becomes larger than the original fear of the situation, thing etc. This “anxiety state”, when the sufferer is afraid of the effects of fatigue, allows this fear to affect their life. At this point, Dr Weekes says, the Nervous Fatigue has become an illness.

Emotional

When nerves are subjected to stress for a long time, especially with strong emotions, like fear, they effectively become trained. As I’ve spoken about before, the more this neural pathway is fired or used, or higher the intensity of emotion, the bigger and stronger the pathway becomes. Therefore, it fires faster and more intensely, with even the slightest of provocations. Dr Weekes, refers to this as “Sensitisation”.

Journey to healing and recovery
All emotions can be intensified: fear, anger, sadness, guilt, as well as love and joy. What a roller coaster! All these exaggerated feelings are tiring for the sufferer. To a point, the body can adapt to the stress of the emotional ups and downs, as long as the adrenal glands can keep up supplying the adrenaline and other essential hormones. When they become depleted, it can lead to adrenal or hormonal depletion and complete exhaustion.

Mental

Most of us can flit lightly between our thoughts. From idea to idea, subject to subject. With mental fatigue, this simple act is not so easy. Their thoughts either come haltingly and slowly, feeling like each individual thought must be specifically selected, making thinking feel like a huge effort. Or they stick together, so that if they begin to think about a certain thing, it tends to feel very difficult to let it go – particularly if it has a strong emotion attached to it, like fear.

“When sensitisation and mental fatigue come together, throwing off frightening thoughts can seem impossible.”

Spirit

Especially if the unknowing sufferer has been trying to recover by fighting their way out of fatigue, they may lose their sense of purpose, and wonder if the struggle to go on is worth it. They don’t need much, a sliver is enough to begin, but it is hope and courage that they need to pull through.

“We all have this strength, this power within us, and it will work miracles if we trust it to.”

How To Overcome Nervous Fatigue

You can relieve this by releasing these 4 types of fatigue, in the same order they built up. This is something that will take time, as we have previously spoken about before, however it will yield great results.

Facing, is acknowledging that even though external guidance support can help, the cure must come from inside oneself.

Acceptance is allowing the body to loosen as much as possible. Moving into the body’s response and letting it come, rather than fighting it. Like being right in the centre of a hurricane, in the “eye” of the storm, where the storm swirls around but cannot reach them. But first they must go through the storm.

The initial instinct is fearful tension, withdrawal or rigidly pushing and forcing, which produces hormones that make the “Storm” feel even stronger and wilder. Facing and relaxing the body into the symptoms with acceptance, on the other hand, help to dampen and eventually stop them.

self care acupressure points
This “allowing” takes time. To feel and to allow. To be able to trust that it will indeed pass. When it comes, it creates peace of mind and confidence built, not in the absence of symptoms, but the deep knowing, even in their midst, that they will pass.

Dr Weekes describes floating very much like breathwork or a visualisation. Allowing the body to relax and go as loose and limp as possible. Then deeply breathing in and slowly exhaling, whilst imagining gently floating, as if on a cloud. Allowing muscles to loosen and release.

Floating creates a sense of relaxation, but it also encompasses, Facing and Accepting, with grace and gentleness.
Dr Weekes says that “Physical support can help more than just physical pain”. Who knew?

Keep it light and simple – eg going to the gym – don’t go crazy making up for time you haven’t been, like the last 4 months during lockdown. Or as a therapist, light and gentle, through to firm, but don’t go hell for leather.

Personal connection is vitally important. What a surprise, she says! Whilst sufferers can overload and get tired very quickly, leaving them to their own devices to relax etc for hours or days at a time, is actually unsupportive. That whilst they may only have the energy reserves to do some activity, some activity is actually essential. Both from the point of view that leaving them to their own devices leaves far too much time for them to fall into negative, energy draining trains of thought, where they can expect the worst, beat themselves up, and generally lose energy.

And because doing things, an exercise or activity of choice, leads to having more energy, do what you can, within your limits, for yourself. In this way, building your own confidence that you can Face the fear. Let it pass.

“One finds strength quicker when active than when lying on the couch waiting for it to come”

 

Utilise our subconscious mind, in the form of simple routines and habits. Again, less is more. Rather than trying to stay relaxed all day, choose a set time, just once a day, to relax or meditate or whatever calming activity you like to do, then let it go for the rest of the day. Don’t worry about it, don’t even think about it. Slowly this will create a habit of success – what a surprise!

Even a short daily routine, like cleaning your teeth, can work. This simple action can give you something to do, something for the mind to focus on. Particularly if you use a manual toothbrush rather than an electric one that buzzes and vibrates in your head. This can help “calm the whirlwind within.”

Journey to healing and recovery
Emotional and hormonal exhaustion aren’t helped much by rest. Only by reducing stress. This is where we must “Face” our fears. Gently and with acceptance, not defensively.

We can gently change our mood. With acceptance, with time, and by moving through them gently, “floating” and allowing. I recall Louise Hay, motivational speaker and author, used to say that if you sit with an emotion and just allow it to pass through you, it usually only takes 10 minutes. Whilst for fatigue sufferers that may seem like a life time, simply allowing, rather than fighting them, will allow energy reserves to be maintained and the emotional energy to be released, rather than held and stored in the body.

Supporting the Spirit through the process; this is the part that sufferers really need help with, as a completely exhausted spirit has no inner source of joy to lift them from inside.

  • Help molehills not turn into mountains. Don’t trivialise their issues, but help them move past them, to other ideas to focus on.
  • Help them to float rather than fight through their journey.
  • Celebrate small wins and encourage flashes of normality, as glimmers of hope to which they can cling to.

“Each of us has unsuspected power to accomplish what we demand of ourselves, if we care to search for it.” – Dr Claire Weekes

If this sounds like you, and you’re needing a little extra help with how to gain relief from your fatigue, osteopathy and massage can assist in getting you back to your usual self.

Feel free to get in touch with Sarah, who provides amazing remedial and therapeutic massage services, for some further advice and guidance, or click the button below to make an appointment.

Had CoVid, and you are still not back to your old self?

Had CoVid, and you are still not back to your old self?

Have you had CoVid, and wondered why, weeks later, you’re still not back to your old self?

You may well be suffering from “long CoVid”, or “post CoVid”, and the after-effects of the virus.

I had covid about 8 weeks ago and the last of the symptoms, my fuzzy tongue, and ongoing fatigue really only began to shift in the last couple of weeks. This prolonged healing time is not uncommon for most viruses, but many of us have become much more aware of this part of the healing and recovery journey, since CoVid’s arrival. Just because you are no longer contagious and can return to work, does not mean that your body is fully recovered from the virus or the effects your body has weathered in defending itself against it.

Breathe release stress

Symptoms of the virus do seem to be different

Symptoms of the virus do seem to be different for everyone. They are often strongest in your individual body’s “weak” spots and tend to be the expression of where the virus is sitting in your body and has managed to get a foothold. The main symptoms I had initially, were a fuzzy edge around my whole tongue, skin irritation, sore neck, fever, inflamed glands, and fatigue. For a few days, I also had aches throughout my whole body. I was fortunate and only suffered those for a few days.

The all-encompassing fatigue was the worst. As a massage therapist, interacting regularly with numerous other people, I had to watch my energy levels. I love my clients with all my heart, even so, when my resilience levels are low, especially as an introvert, there is a finite number of people I can manage to work with each day, without feeling drained. For me, it was about prioritising my effectiveness with my clients. Meaning keeping my energy levels up. This meant that for a period of time, I couldn’t see as many clients as I usually would. This obviously had a business-level impact, but it also impacted me, as just an individual. So, to maximise my effectiveness with and for clients, my focus, my concentration, and my attitude, which all consume energy, and still have enough energy to cope with the rest of my life, I had become deliberate about what I did and didn’t do. I had to learn how to take my self-care and energy management habits to the next level.

This blog is about the things I learned along the way, and what we, the team at BlossomingMe, are now focusing on, to take even better care of ourselves and our clients, through the post-CoVid healing journey. Much of these actions and habits can also be applied to times when you go through any big changes in life. Whether it’s a virus, like Glandular Fever/ Epstein Barr virus, auto-immune reactions like Urticaria, or other skin reactions, or other life-changing events or stressors like moving house or having a baby. Especially in the postpartum period, close to delivery, when your body goes through more changes, in readjusting to no longer being pregnant, these actions and routines can help you feel better and recover more quickly.

Low Energy Levels

One of the first indications I had, that I was still suffering low energy and the general symptoms of “long CoVid”, was my business partner asking me, three mornings in a row, “what was wrong?”, “was everything ok?”. Whilst in the moment, this didn’t help, in that, it drew my attention to the negative emotions I was feeling, rather than helping me find and focus on the positive ones that were also there. It did make me realise that there was an issue that needed to be dealt with. That I hadn’t recovered as fully as I had thought. My resilience was still low and I wasn’t coping with challenges as well as I usually might.

Breathe release stress

One reason that managing my energy levels was, and still is, important is the effect that my energy levels, and therefore my resilience levels, have on my attitude. Like the spike proteins that are what allow the Coronaviruses to penetrate the host cells in our body and cause the infection, (https://www.news-medical.net/health/What-are-Spike-Proteins.aspx), my personality became very prickly. Protecting my mental attitude, in order to lower my defensiveness and reduce my prickliness, as well as to increase my resilience and ability to cope when things around me didn’t go to plan, became a  mission. 

Journey to healing and recovery

Minimising the number of people I saw

Managing my energy levels was a multifold process. One aspect was managing people interactions, another was supporting and nurturing my body through its physical and emotional healing, and the third was maintaining my precious, positive headspace.

The people aspect, I managed basically by staying close to work and home. Keeping quiet and keeping close interactions with people to a minimum. Not being in crowds of people, not even for my birthday. This was really trimmed down to basically immediate family and clients only. Both lockdown and naturally being an introvert, certainly helped a lot with this.

Reducing the number of projects and ultimately tasks

Just like I deliberately minimised the number of people I saw, or more specifically, emotionally connected with, to keep my energy levels high. I came to realise just how much multitasking really does not equal multi-focusing. The process of focusing my concentration became a much more deliberate, intentional, and conscious one.

I found reducing my focus from broad to laser-focused hard because my natural bent is big picture and historically, details have not been my forte. In fact, they often downright scare and overwhelm me. However, whilst big picture thinking has its uses, when my energy was limited, what I really needed, was to focus on getting specific tasks done and completed.

I began learning to reduce the number of projects and ultimately tasks I was trying to do at once.  As Henry Ford said, “Nothing is particularly hard if you divide it into small jobs.”

I started to concentrate on breaking the projects down into bite-sized tasks. Small enough that I could action without overwhelming myself and freaking out or feeling completely exhausted and beaten before I’d even started. This process didn’t happen overnight and if I’m honest, is one that I am still learning.

One strategy is organising my week, at least mostly at the beginning of the week, so that the most important projects or tasks are prioritised and done. Another is to protect my headspace more, whilst I actually do these tasks. One way that helped me both organise my week better and protect my headspace, as I’d heard so many times before, was to set up business sprints. Short bursts of focused time, usually about 60-90 minutes each. The times for each of these sprints and what each one was dedicated to doing, were noted in my calendar and eventually even on my Trello board. This strategy helped me immensely, to structure my time and my focus so that I could keep the main thing, the main thing. It helped me lift the energy drain from feeling scattered and directionless and save my energy for my main focuses, my family, and my clients.

As well as consciously setting up, and learning to use these sprints of time, I used some of the spaces between them and clients, to clear my mind. Meditation is something I’ve been doing for a few years. My favourite styles are simple. Either repeating mantras or listening to guided visualisations. As Adam Fraser talks about in his book, “The Third Space”, (reading is another favourite relaxing and nurturing activity of mine) these spaces between activities became very valuable, in helping me to change my focus. They were especially useful when I ran into things like roadblocks in trying to solve a computer or technology issue. They helped me to separate mentally, from the issue and frustration around it, before stepping into a session with a client. So that I was able to leave the discomfort of dealing with machines, as well as my anxiety and prickliness, from the issue remaining unresolved, outside. That way I could also focus on the specific problems for the client at hand, and the joy of finding solutions for them.

Working with these strategies deliberately, step by step has helped me come out of my Post-CoVid recovery with a stronger mindset. So that I feel more in charge.

Self-nurturing and Supplementing

From a physical health perspective, one of the questions that came up for me was “can I accept nurturing​ from others​… yet?” for example an osteopathy treatment or remedial massage.​ To be honest, this may take a while to return. It certainly took me longer than I expected. Even as a touchy-feely massage therapist myself, as well as a generally huggy person, although I still definitely enjoyed a simple, long hug from my hubby,​ I did not feel the desire to be nurtured so much by others. Particularly not being touched much by others. I did have an osteopathic treatment a couple of weeks ago, to support my body’s healing, but it’s really only now, 8 weeks later, that I’m looking for a massage myself.

Self-nurturing, on the other hand, was very powerful and really felt like an essential part of my healing. What worked really well for me were frequent baths. Both simple, Epsom salt foot baths, and full-body soaks in detox baths. Using an easy, homemade recipe designed by our osteopath. These really helped to ease not only my body aches but my mental and emotional irritability and smooth my sharp edges around people, as well. They were also instrumental in helping me to regain and maintain my positive attitude as well as rebuild my resilience.

self care acupressure points

Supplementing with vitamins and herbs, such as Echinacea, especially at the beginning, can be very helpful in supporting your immune system to deal with the invading virus. While antioxidants like vitamin C, garlic, can work very well for your immune system longer term. Zinc can help the vitamin C be absorbed, and work better in your body. And finally, NAC (N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine) can amplify the effectiveness of the anti-oxidants and can be particularly helpful to your body in clearing out the spikey proteins, that the virus left behind.

This is how we take care of our clients

and encourage them to take care of themselves, post-CoVid, as well as post-childbirth, moving house and any number of other stressful events you may have experienced.

We would love to take care of you. Either through the process, if you so choose, or, you know, once you’ve resolved these initial symptoms. 

 

 

 

Let us guide you along your wellbeing journey BlossomingMe is a holistic health service located on Sydney’s Upper North Shore.

Our specialised Remedial Massage Therapist and Osteopath offer a fully integrated approach which assesses and addresses the specific issues in your body.

With a clear understanding of your goals, we treat both mind and body to help you live your best life.

 

Your teacher was right!

Your teacher was right!

Your teacher was right, sitting up straight affects your performance. We all know that our body responds to the way we think, feel, and act. How we carry ourselves when we walk or move reflects how we feel inside. For instance, when we feel down, we often frown, hunch shoulders and face downwards. When we’re anxious, we may tap our feet or shift our eyes, and when happy we tend to smile.

Walking Styles

It’s no wonder many assume it’s the mind that controls the body, not the other way around. But, did you realise that the relationship between your mind and body runs both ways? Interestingly, whilst your mind definitely influences your body, your body posture and physiology also trigger thoughts and emotions in your mind.

This leads us to the reversed concept that William James, founder of modern-day psychology, proposed; “We don’t laugh because we’re happy – we’re happy because we laugh.” Another common example of this same idea is that if you act confidently, even when you’re not, you may begin to feel confident. ‘Fake it till you make it’.

But how does this relate to how we sit? And did our primary or elementary school teacher know about it?

We're Happy because we laugh - William James
Sitting Styles

Several studies on students’ sitting positions have found that students who sat slouched forward, more crunched up or hunched over themselves tend to notice more feelings of “hopelessness, helplessness, powerlessness, and negativity”, especially about themselves.

While those who “sat up straight” were more likely to focus on empowering, positive feelings about themselves. They were better able to think, and were more likely to trust their own thoughts, opinions, and abilities. They had more energy and a greater feeling of control, as well as resiliency. They also displayed an ability to tolerate pain and emotional distress. And were more creative and were more expressive.

So if you find yourself slouching for hours at a badly placed home computer, it may not only lead to a high number of headaches, and neck and shoulder pain, which in itself is unpleasant enough right? It also may significantly contribute to lower energy levels and a rise of depression.

Our simple advice to you is this: Be kind to yourself, take frequent breaks, sit straight in an ergonomically sound position and you might just find that you have more energy, focus, creativity, higher trust in yourself and even better able to express yourself.

Wow! Who would have thought it would be as simple as taking our teachers’ advice to simply sit up straight?

We're Happy because we laugh - William James

Let us guide you along your wellbeing journey. BlossomingMe is a holistic health service located on Sydney’s Upper North Shore.

Our specialised Remedial Massage Therapist and Osteopath offer a fully integrated approach which assesses and addresses the specific issues in your body.

With a clear understanding of your goals, we treat both mind and body to help you live your best life.

 

Is Self Care Selfish?

Is Self Care Selfish?

Self-care is vital, and one of the least selfish things you can do to improve your life. When you invest time in caring for yourself, you’ll reap the benefits and return on investment in almost every area of your life. You may notice improvement in your physical and mental health, your relationships with yourself and others will likely improve, and your productivity increases. It enables you to become the best version of yourself, able to give more to the people and projects that are important in your life. It allows you to truly blossom.

How can self-care benefit me?

Simple self-care activities can help ease your body’s aching muscles and painful joints. Self care can also increase energy, reduce stress, uplift your mindset and attitude. It can increase your resilience, and boost your immunity, generally supporting your wellbeing. You may even gain clarity about who you are, where you’re going, what’s important to you and why.
 
At our clinic, we find that much healing happens in the time between one consultation and the next.
We observe that the best results occur for our clients when they implement self-care activities to boost the healing and recovery process.

What is Self-Care?

Many people seem daunted by self-care. Some people over complicate a self-care act and think it means allocating a whole day at an expensive day spa. It doesn’t need to be this extravagant. Self-care can be as simple as taking a moment to remember to breathe.  So let’s practice together right now… 

Take a long, slow, deep breath and feel it filling your lungs and into your belly. Hold it for a few seconds, then release the air through your mouth.

It’s like releasing a steam valve. By taking the pressure off, you prevent it from “popping its seal” or “overflowing”. The secret is regularity. So make self-care as simple, enjoyable, and easily repeatable as possible. Creating lifelong habits, to support your physical and mental wellbeing.

Breathe release stress
Journey to healing and recovery

What Self-Care Activities appeal to you?

To support you with actively implementing self-care into your daily lives, we’ve created a self-care list for you.  It’s vital when creating a self care routine or habit that you choose something you enjoy. It needs to work for you and uplift you.

Here’s a list of some of our favourites self-care activities:

  • Go for a walk or run

  • Immerse yourself in nature, either in the bushwalking or along a beach

  • Stretch, even gentle stretching will get your body moving again, boost circulation and ease achy joints into action

  • Read a good book

  • Listen to your favourite music – create a playlist.

  • Create something (baking, sewing, arts and crafts, a piece of furniture)

  • Start a journal

  • Play with Pets

  • Talk to a friend

Self-care-list-BlossomingMe-Turramurra-Osteopathy-Massage
  • Take a bath

You can make it a luxurious one, to make you feel extra special and nurtured. Try using:

    • Epsom salts or
    • Essential oils such as
      • Lavender to relax
      • Peppermint to soothe tired, achy muscles, or
      • Eucalyptus to refresh and clear any sinus challenges, particularly in the cooler, dryer autumn and winter weather.
  • Moisturise your entire body.

Choose something that feels nourishing. Nurture your body and make it sing with pleasure.

  • Watch a movie

  • Meditation is a favourite of mine

  • Mindful activity

If meditation isn’t for you, do an activity in a mindful, deliberate way. By this, I mean clear any distraction and be fully focused on one small task. It might be over a simple cup of tea, for example. For these few moments, focus intently on your senses: can you smell the aroma of the tea? What is the taste as you sip? Can you feel the warmth of the cup in your hands? Stay in the moment as long as possible.

  • Acupressure Points

You can press acupressure points on yourself at home to strengthen your body, mind, and spirit. They can help release emotions like sadness, grief, or loss, as well as boost your personal composure.

Especially during Autumn, when the meridian channel of metal is in its element, (for more information click our blog). These metal points can help you let go of anything you no longer need. This practice releases physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual tension, as well as strengthening you from the inside out.

You can activate these acupressure points by stroking or pressing on the points. Let’s do it together now. See the diagram:  Large Intestine1 (LI1)  and Lung 8 (Lu8).

Large Intestine 1 and Lung 8:

These points clear and calm the mind, to revitalise you. They clear stuck energy and emotions.

  • On the radial (also thumb) side of the index finger, about 0.1 finger width posterior to (towards the back of the hand) from the corner of the nail.
  • Stroke your lower arm upwards, in line with the pointer finger, towards your body
  • To invigorate the energy further, press the point gently – 3-7 times
self care acupressure points
Journey to healing and recovery
  • Release old thoughts that no longer serve you. 

This has the additional benefit of releasing any habits that also no longer serve you. Then, deliberately bring in new ones, which support and uplift you. 

    • One habit I recently explored is a tool I learned from mindset extraordinaire, Ben Elliott. He describes a simple process in which, if something happens, a trigger, something that would usually set you off or upset you in some way, you can decide to react differently.

Here’s an example of how I practice this new habit. When something happens that I’m not happy with, in the clinic or more often, in myself, I choose to refocus my attention on anything that I’m grateful for. Here’s a few that work for me:

      • Simple – Having two feet that work and support me well
      • Personal – Receiving a thoughtful phone call or text from my step-children. Or the cosy feeling of being loved supported and surrounded by my wonderful hubby and family.

Sinking into that feeling of appreciation and warmth, helps me regain my composure, refocus my energy and stay strong.

This process does take practice before it becomes automatic. Moving from being “triggered” and reacting , to deliberately choosing a better response (thought or action).  Simply put, this formula is: “When X (trigger), Do Y (new response)”.

  • Ask for help

If you notice any niggles as you implement some of these “at home” self-care activities, consider complementary professional assistance, this too is an act of self-care.

    • e.g. if you feel physical aches and pains, consider booking an appointment with your favourite Osteopath, Chrio, Accupuncturist or Massage Therapist. Or consider salt therapy rooms, an infra red sauna or float tank.
    • For mental and emotional support, consider a Counsellor, Psychologist or Mind Set Coach.

This self-care list is just the tip of the iceberg. Select activities which make you feel stronger, refreshed rejuvinated or nurtured.  After a while, you may be inspired to try something new. We strongly encourage you to do so!

When you do, we’d love to hear about it. Please let us know how you go, in our Facebook community group.

Let us guide you along your wellbeing journey BlossomingMe is a holistic health service located on Sydney’s Upper North Shore.

Our specialised Remedial Massage Therapist and Osteopath offer a fully integrated approach which assesses and addresses the specific issues in your body.

With a clear understanding of your goals, we treat both mind and body to help you live your best life.

 

When Will I Feel Better?

When Will I Feel Better?

When will it feel like I don’t have to keep coming back on such a frequent basis?

“When will I feel better?” – Most of our clients seeking Osteopathic treatment ask this question at some stage in their healing and recovery journey. This blog will address this frequently asked question with the aim to educate and manage expectations.

While it’s difficult to provide an exact answer, as everyone is different. We can however give you an idea of the ‘average’ recovery period  and the factors that might hasten your recovery.

Some people find the problem they came in with disappeared almost straight away. Others find it improves with each session, but over the first few weeks, it seems to keep coming back. This can sometimes feel like a boomerang, and you can become concerned that while treatment provides relief, it doesn’t appear to go away completely.

So how long does it take to get better after an osteopathic treatment?

While we know that by the 4th or 5th session, you will be well on your way in the healing process. We have also observed over and over again that it’s generally not until about the 8th session that clients really start to feel the transformation.

Can you explain why you recommend such a long treatment plan?

Within the first session or three, you will notice considerable relief and more mobility. You likely will even notice changes and improvements throughout the week. These improvements between sessions occur as your body continues to process and assimilate the changes and space created in the treatment session.

While you’ll feel some improvement, you  may find your body is feeling less comfortable again. This usually happens by the end of the period between sessions. If you notice this, we understand it’s easy to feel disheartened, and wonder whether a change is happening, or if you have to keep coming back…

Alexis Weidland Osteopath Blossoming Me Treating client

What can I do to aid my recovery?

  • Eat well – your body’s ability to heal is aided by good nutrition
  • Rest after treatments
  • Understand your body is trying to heal itself
  • Reduce emotional stress and strain as it slows recovery
  • Follow the treatment plan, do the exercises – Your daily exercises make a HUGE difference

Trust your body and follow the treatment plan

Our message to you, is this: keep an open mind, trust your body and follow the plan that we have created with you. As your body continues to heal and assimilate, a transformation happens! As stated above, this often is around the 8th to 10th session. At this point, you likely still are not “fixed”, but your body has started to stabilise. In this more stable place, your body can relax a little, allowing you to keep healing and strengthening, but simultaneously feel more resilient.

At this stage, you’re less likely to fall back into the old habits, movements and pain. And when a small disruption happens, you notice your body has more resilience, such that previously, when whatever challenge occurred, you would have been in pain for days. Whereas now, if there is pain, it seems to easily resolve itself in a day or so, or does not create a noticeable problem at all.

Treating underlying issues and maintenance

At this point, the space between treatment sessions can also increase. So that we can continue to stimulate healing and realignment, and deal with the underlying issues that contributed to your injury or compensation patterns in the first place, while allowing you to do more home-based maintenance. Allowing you to be in control of maintaining, improving, and dealing with any minor flare-ups along the way. While you focus on strengthening yourself in a more balanced way, to help you stay well and strong, and without pain.

It’s easy to forget

Some people quickly forget the problem they initially came in with. They become aware of all the other issues that they either: didn’t realise they had, didn’t realise that we could assist with. Often, in this situation, you can become so aware of the current symptom, and that it’s not as perfect as you would like yet, that it’s easy to forget the symptoms that have greatly improved or even completely disappeared. In this scenario, it’s probably not until the later stages of the first or second phases of the treatment process, around 10 sessions or more, that you begin to notice how far you have come and how good you feel – in general, and especially compared to what you felt when you began treatment.

 

Most importantly, know you can smile, and exhale, as Alexis’ caring, compassionate approach, combined with professional skills and qualifications as an Osteopath, means you are in safe hands.

If you are unsure about your response to treatment or would like some advice, don’t hesitate to contact Alexis directly, and she will do her best to guide you through.

With True Healing comes Resilience
Spring Cleaning in Autumn!

Spring Cleaning in Autumn!

Working with the energy of the seasons

One of the things Alexis and are passionate about is nurturing our bodies through the power of nature. Tapping into the cycle of the seasons and utilising this energy to strengthen and nourish us. And helping others to do the same.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, we have channels of energy through our body. These energy channels, called Meridian channels, support our body, mind, spirit and emotions. There are 12 main channels altogether. Grouped in pairs and one set of four meridians. Each set is associated with characteristics, including a season, an element, an emotion, that we may feel if that energy becomes stuck, and a primary function.

In Autumn, the season we are right in the middle of now, the Lung and Large Intestine meridians channels, in the metal element are at their strongest. The emotion, if our energy gets stuck here, is grief. But the counterpoint to that, or the power and primary function of the energy of the metal element, is letting go of. Releasing, so that we can rejuvenate and refresh.

If we think about the function of our Large Intestines and Lungs, this starts to make sense. Our Large Intestines help us eliminate waste from our body after we’ve absorbed all the nutrition from our food. Our Lungs release the old, used air, making room for the new air they inhale.
And we can tap into this energy of Metal and Autumn, of the Lung and Large Intestine meridian channels, to help us do the same thing in our lives.

“Spring” Cleaning & Decluttering in Autumn!

Usually, we think cleaning, decluttering and re-organising our homes as a “Spring” Clean, but doing it in autumn can actually support us. Making this process of releasing the old and creating room for the new, easier.

We can sort and organise our wardrobe, study or office desk and computer files, kitchen cupboards and generally de-clutter. Go through our computer and delete files we don’t need anymore. Go through our wardrobe and put together a collection of clothes we don’t wear anymore. Instead, we can make a donation to feel great about!

We can use this energy not just in a physical environmental sense. We can utilise it to boost our ability to let go of what we no need, like aches or tension in our body, and stressors in our mind. Helping us to clear old habits, old ideas, any physical or psychological clutter, that no longer serve us. As such, autumn is a good time to reflect on what we may be holding onto and work these ideas through fully so that they can be completely released.

Journey to healing and recovery

Uncovering the Real You

In her book, “The Gift”, psychiatrist, Dr Edith Eger explains that “in trying to keep ourselves modest, we risk making ourselves less than we really are”. She says that the foundation for being our whole self, for being truly healthy and joy-filled, is our ability to love ourselves.

But what really spoke to me, in her book, was the concept that once we begin healing, “what you discover will not be the new you, but the real you.” The You who was there all along. Born innately beautiful and full of love and joy.

Edit goes on to say that if we want to take charge of our thinking, we first need to look at our actions, what we’re doing, and what we’re saying to ourselves, and ask: “is it empowering or depleting me?” “Is it kind and loving?”

Recently, One challenge I’ve been falling into is the trap of negative thoughts and the roller coaster of emotions that they bring. When I’ve woken up early in the morning, I get annoyed that I’m awake, which leads to other annoyed thoughts and I get sucked into the cycle of negative thoughts, that turn into a tidal wave! It’s hard to break and left me getting up in the morning, “on the wrong side of the bed”, angry and frustrated with the world and focused on what wasn’t working for me. Not a great way to start the day!

The other day I took myself through a process that Edith talks about. One that I haven’t done for ages. I took time to journal my thoughts. Just jotting them down each hour through the day. With no judgement or analysis.
Just bringing them up to my conscious awareness level.

That night, I woke up at 3 am, as I often do.
But this time, I was finally able to remember, at 3 in the morning, that I had a choice about what to focus on and where my thoughts went. I was finally able to choose to find things to be grateful for! A husband who loves me, a family who cares about me and supports me, and a business I love working in.
But I wasn’t able to start there. I had to start with really simple things, like: 2 eyes I can see well with, 2 nostrils I can breathe through (that’s actually quite a big one since I’ve had sinus & respiratory troubles all my life), teeth I can chew with, tongue I can taste yummy food with, 2 legs that carry me and 2 arms I use all day, for writing and sharing my thoughts & insights & for helping clients deal with their issues and improve their lives, to the best of my ability.

Another tool I’ve used numerous times, to start to change negative thoughts I’ve had, these are some phrases I like to add:
“That used to be me”
“….. yet”
“Up until now ….”
We can use phrases like these to take back our own power, gently. We can even utilise them to empower affirmations. Making them feel more real and possible. Expanding out thinking and self-belief also themes empowered throughout the season of Autumn and enabling us to bring in qualities and characteristics we desire for ourselves, as we become our best versions of ourselves.

Until we can change our language, as Edith predicts will happen, and we can genuinely, authentically and strongly state:
“Yes I am!”
“Yes I can!”
“Yes I will!”

Women Initiative

Nurture and Nourish Our Body, to Strengthen Our Immunity

One of the best and simplest ways to strengthen our lungs is deep breathing. Especially outdoors, in the brisk autumn air. This nurtures and nourishes our immune system, supports our energy, and promotes good sleep.

When we breathe deeply and deliberately, we flush our cells with the oxygen needed for all our bodily processes. Promoting the process of releasing and rejuvenating.
So next time we take our morning or evening walk outdoors, take and moment to take a few long, slow, deep breaths. Letting the cool air seep into the lungs, strengthening them.
As you breathe the air out, know that this process, of air flowing in and out of our body, is helping us to release. To let go of anything that is no longer supporting us. Be it social, emotional, mental or physical.

Through our nose, mouth and skin pores, our lungs interact directly with the outside environment, giving them an important role in fighting off external pathogens, like viruses and bacteria.
As the temperature drops and winds become dry you may notice cold or flu-like symptoms such as a stiff neck, body aches, chills, fever, sore throat, headache, cough and runny nose. Existing skin conditions such as eczema or psoriasis may get aggravated, and asthma or allergy reactions may flare. Now is the time to strengthen our Chi, energy, to prepare for winter.

Healthy foods that can be easily added to many dishes, to further nourish our bodies and our family, include: bay leaves, garlic, horseradish, leek, ginger, capers. They can support our lungs and boost our immune systems, naturally.

For further support and strengthen our immune system and our whole bodies, with a “tune-up”, we can visit our preferred professional practitioner. An osteopath, acupuncturist, naturopath or transformational massage therapist (see website link), can really help us make a difference.

Wishing You Happiness and Strength This Autumn!

If you knew that you could, which aches and pains in your body, would you let go of?

If you were courageous enough, what thoughts, ideas or habits would you release?

 

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