Notice, nurture, nourish: Simple tips for a healthier mind and body – Part 3

Notice, nurture, nourish: Simple tips for a healthier mind and body – Part 3

In this three-part series, we give you some easy, practical tips on how to feel more refreshed and energised so you can focus on creating your excellent life.

Part 3: Nourish

Healthy eating becomes vital when we’re under stress. By taking in proper nutrients, we can increase our focus and concentration and stabilise our emotions, even during the toughest of times.

But when we’re stressed out and busy, how often do we reach for a chocolate bar, a packet of chips or make ourselves another coffee? It can be difficult maintaining healthy habits when we’re under pressure. That’s why it’s useful to have healthy habits set up before we need to rely on them. In other words, making it easier for our bodies to work smarter, not harder.

Food trends come and go so often, it can be difficult to know what we should be eating.

One thing is clear, however – eating is a positive, life enhancing act of self-nurturing. That’s why it’s important to focus on the mind, and our beliefs around eating first. Eating should bring joy, not guilt or pressure.

Developing awareness

Try to develop awareness in your body by finding what food works for you. When you eat something, does it make you feel alive and energised, or do you get a quick rush of energy and then feel flat and drained soon after?

Ever had a large pasta dish for lunch and not long after, you’re struggling to stay awake? By 3pm you can’t keep your eyes open, and you’re hunting for a coffee and chocolate bar for another pick me up?

Having a large meal focuses your body’s energy on digestion, leaving little energy for focus and concentration. The carbohydrate loading of the pasta itself makes it worse by creating a quick energy increase and then dropping flat. You then repeat again with the caffeine and sugar in the coffee and chocolate bar and wonder why you feel lousy.

What can we do differently?

Let’s start with eating less, more often.

Eating a little bit every hour or two is a great way to keep your metabolism going and your energy stable. This helps to boost your metabolism and keep it running at a higher rate. It can stabilise blood sugar levels, which helps concentration and enables your body to cope better with stress. It can stop the rollercoaster of high and low energy and help maintain or even reduce weight, if that’s a goal you have. So, three small meals a day, with snacks in between, is a good start.

Proteins

Proteins are the building blocks of our body. They make up our skin, bones, muscles, ligaments, hair and nails. Foods such as dairy, eggs, meat, fish, nuts, legumes and some plants e.g. broccoli, avocado and spinach are good sources of protein.

Proteins are made up of molecules called amino acids. Nine of these are essential, meaning that our body can’t make them, so we need to eat them. Different foods contain different types of amino acids, so eating a wide variety of foods ensures we have the best chance to consume a whole range of them.

Protein is also a natural appetite suppressor as it keeps the levels of Ghrelin, a chemical in our system that makes us feel hungry, lower for longer.

Protein is also great at improving our mood and our resistance to stress. Tryptophan is the amino acid that produces the hormone serotonin. Serotonin can reduce depression, anxiety, headaches, insomnia, memory and learning problems and generally improve our mental processing ability. Research suggests that if we want to remain in a positive, uplifted and stable mood, eat small, regular protein portions through the day. So next time you’re feeling flat, instead of that chocolate bar, grab a handful of nuts such as raw almonds and observe how you feel.

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are found in fruit, vegetables and grains and contain the various vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that are vital for maintaining our general health. They can boost our immune system so that our body can defend itself against bacteria, viruses and free radicals that are in our everyday surroundings, as well as repair and protect us at a cellular level. And of course, they’re important for increasing our energy levels.

This is another reason why small portions more often are so important. If we have a large carbohydrate hit all at once, like with the pasta meal I mentioned earlier, you get an energy boost for a very short time, then fall in a heap and need tooth picks to keep your eyelids open. The more natural and less processed the sugar in the food is, like fruit rather than chocolate, the lower the spike. If you have protein with carbohydrates, such as peanut butter with an apple, that can also lower the energy spike and make it last longer.

Good fats, bad fats

If you remember that motor oil ad – Oils Ain’t Oils, that’s true for our bodies too. Our cell walls are made of fat, so we need fat, but not just any fat.

Many oils change their structure and how they operate in your body when they are heated. These are fats like trans fats or hydrogenated vegetable oils. They’re heated to preserve items such as muffins from the convenience store – they never get old or go off. They just clog our cells.

The safest fats to cook with don’t change much when heated. These include coconut oil, rice bran oil and ghee. Great oils to eat raw in things like homemade salad dressings include olive oil, avocado oil or straight avocados.

Omega 3s, found in deep sea fish and flaxseed oil, have been shown to increase our ability to handle stress, lower depression and anxiety and other mood related conditions, such as autism. They also help us to think faster and clearer. The neurones, or nerve cells in our brains, actually operate better and fire quicker. This is especially beneficial in pregnant women, for the development of their baby’s brain.

And don’t forget to drink water. We are more than 75% water, so drinking 2-3 litres a day helps flush your system and is also important for digestion, especially in processing fats.

Planning is key

Planning what you eat can be simple and empowering. I spoke to a lawyer not so long ago. She was recently married and she and her husband were working very long hours. Out the door early and back around 9pm, too late to start preparing dinner. We talked about the types of food they like to eat and worked out a plan for them to store simple salad basics in the fridge at work for a healthy lunch that they could easily add different things to, like olives or feta cheese. We also worked out a basic weekly dinner plan that they could prepare and cook the night before and keep in the fridge to heat up as soon as they got home.

Once you’ve planned out what you need, create a shopping list then either buy the items online and have it delivered, or, if you go to the shops, make sure you go with a full tummy, rather than being hungry. You’ll be far less tempted to buy things that are not on the list.

Strawberries at eye level - healthy snacking

Making better choices

Marketers spend thousands of dollars on item placement at the supermarket because it can have enormous impact on what people buy. How could you use that concept to encourage better food choices on a daily basis at home?

What is visible at eye level? These are things we see often, and our unconscious mind will most often be tempted by them, even if it’s not what we went to the fridge for. So, put as much in the way of fresh fruit, vegetables and proteins at eye level.

On harder to see shelves, put breads or grains, and behind them, any treats you might keep in the house. Reducing the number of times our unconscious mind is exposed to seeing them is an easy way to keep them out of sight and out of mind. This means we are less tempted, without restrictions or punishments. Having your mind and body working with you rather than against you, is another way you can work smarter rather than harder.

What are your go to foods that help you feel nourished? Let us know in the comments below.

Notice, nurture, nourish: Simple tips for a healthier mind and body – Part 3

Notice, nurture, nourish: Simple tips for a healthier mind and body – Part 2

Notice, nurture, nourish: Simple tips for a healthier mind and body

In this three-part series, we give you some easy, practical tips on how to feel more refreshed and energised so you can focus on creating your excellent life.L

Part 2: Nurture

It’s a well-known fact that people who experience high levels of stress tend to get sick more than others. Combine stress with lack of sleep and poor nutrition, and our immune system’s ability to naturally protect us against infection and disease is greatly reduced.

A great way to help reduce stress and improve your resilience is to increase your physical activity. That’s right – good old exercise.

Physical activity makes us feel more positive and confident by raising our endorphins – chemicals that can trigger a positive feeling in the body. People who are physically active often talk about the ‘runner’s high’ – the feeling of euphoria after a good workout.

And with its ability to help us relax and sleep better, exercise is now commonly prescribed by doctors treating patients for anxiety and depression.

But it’s not always easy to fit in regular exercise. How many of us have started an exercise routine and let it slip as life gets in the way?

Thankfully, you don’t need to commit to a strenuous workout, or an expensive gym membership, to reap the benefits of physical activity. Just a small amount of movement can help reduce stress, increase energy levels and even your ability to concentrate and focus, making you more productive throughout the day.

Here are some simple, but effective ways to get us moving:

  • Talk to a colleague face to face instead of emailing them. Your communication is likely to be more effective and you’ll develop a closer working relationship at the same time.
  • When shopping, park further away from the entrance. You’ll add extra steps and longer time carrying those weights (shopping bags), without going too far out of your way.
  • Schedule a walking meeting. Choose a nice beach or park to walk through if you can to make it more pleasant. You’ll find that walking together, in the same direction at about the same pace and speed, naturally helps your unconscious minds to be more collaborative and see the world from similar perspectives.
  • If you catch public transport, get off a stop earlier. This helps you fit in an extra walk without it feeling like too much of a burden.
  • Move while on the phone. If we stand up when we’re making calls, we sound clearer, more confident and we often feel mentally more capable.
  • Make cleaning a fun activity. Break it up into smaller tasks and delegate to family members or colleagues. Why not turn it into a group relay? One person does a first step e.g. empty the top shelf of the dishwasher, then goes and taps the next person to take a two minute stretch break and empty the bottom shelf. Before long everyone in the office has gotten up and moved and the kitchen is clean!
  • Stretch at your desk. Hold a simple upper body stretch at your desk for 3-5 seconds or get up and do a full body stretch. Stretching brings proper blood flow and nutrient supply to our muscles and tissues, especially our brain. This can help prevent fatigue, discomfort and reduce the risk of injury, stiffness, aches and pains and even lower our risk of osteoarthritis.
  • Get out of your comfort zone. I have a friend who is a computer programmer. He has a brilliant solution to getting stumped with programming problems – he goes rollerblading in the park. It gets him outside, in the fresh air, away from the problems at hand. Enabling his conscious mind to focus on something completely different gives his unconscious mind the opportunity to think through the problem. Often, he will arrive back at the office having worked out the solution.
  • Exercise with others. Having a gym partner or belonging to an exercise group can help keep you accountable as we’re more likely to turn up when others are relying on us being there. It’s also a wonderful way to connect with others and nurture our minds at the same time.

Other things we can do to nurture ourselves include:

  • Massage. Previously considered a ‘luxury’, massage is now rapidly gaining popularity as a way to improve mental and physical wellbeing. A remedial massage can undo knots in your muscles, decrease aches and pains in your body, boost our immune system, lower heart rate and blood pressure and increase blood circulation, helping our body to eliminate waste and increase access to fresh nutrients. As for the mental benefits, massage can relax your mind and de-stress you.
  • Epsom salt bath. The magnesium in the salts seeps into muscles, relaxing and rejuvenating them. A foot bath after standing for a long period can help restore our feet and calves and help our mind unwind too.

What are some of the ways you nurture yourself, or others already? Let us know in the comments below.

 

2019Reset

2019Reset

Spring 10 Day Reset

Join us, 29th April 2019 to make a few simple changes, just for 10 days. A quick way to reset or boost your metabolism, aid detoxification and feel great. Allowing you to Restore * Refresh * Re-Energise

In this busy and stressful world, we can’t escape the multitude of chemicals in our food, water, air, personal care and cleaning products and even home furniture and furnishings. Our body’s are constantly bombarded with stimuli, stress and chemicals and are therefore constantly active – filtering, neutralising and removing metabolic waste products and added toxins.

Even when our body’s are effective at this and coping enough to stay healthy, it still makes sense to help support this amazing system. We can do this by including simple, regular activities that help reduce build up and therefore reduce the load placed on our digestive, immune and detoxification processes. This also optimises repair and rebuilding processes to maximise our strength, mobility, function, comfort and energy. What’s more, it helps to minimise and maybe even reverse “age related” wrinkles, hormone imbalances and even, symptoms of chronic illnesses.

It’s a combination of core principles, focusing on 4 main areas

  1. Diet
  2. Movement,
  3. Mental
  4. Lifestyle

We then, split this into 10 daily modules, detailing each topic and containing simple, actionable steps

Simple and easy to implement, it’s a matter of small actions performed daily to produce a transformational outcome.

It’s the application of effective action steps within these 4 areas that allows massive change. Shifting the body to a more alkaline state which translates directly to

  • reduced inflammation
  • improved healing/repair
  • improved hormone balance

=> anti-aging

=> reduced pain

=> increased energy

To Join Us

Register Now

Once Registered, you’ll receive an email explaining how to ensure you are part of the closed Facebook group.

You’ll also get a link to access a bonus Healthy Treats Recipe ebook

Via the closed Facebook group, you will receive mini worksheets and action steps for each day and details of a short, simple and effective excerise program, when we come to the movement module.

This is a 10 day program designed to do 2 main things

  • provide you with a simple 10 day detoxification process that you can keep coming back to, whenever you feel you need it (yearly, or seasonally)
  • help you create healthful habits that you can implement into your everyday life.

Optimising what you put in, to Maximise what you get out – To keep you energised, looking good and feeling great. No matter your age!

Please be aware

  • If you have a specific issue, it is best that you undertake this program under the guidance of your primary healthcare professional.
  • It is a short detoxification program, not a “weight loss” regime. It will give you quick results to boost your metabolism and your energy, and help you feel more comfortable as well as have less pain, and it is highly likely you will lose fat and build stamina within this short time
  • While you could follow this basic program to allowing you to lose fat and build tone, stamina, strength and flexibility. A healthful and sustainable weight loss program will take a minimum 3 months. Realise that we are a product of what we have eaten, done and thought over the past 3-12 months. We replace every cell in the body, but this takes months and in some cases years to complete. While we feed our body the right things, we will replace each cell with healthier ones… an exciting and empowering idea! Consistency, Patience and Belief is KEY
Pelvic pain and dysfunction part 3: 7 tips to nip that pain in the butt

Pelvic pain and dysfunction part 3: 7 tips to nip that pain in the butt

Pelvic pain and dysfunction part 3: 7 tips to nip that pain in the butt

In part 1 and part 2, we discussed the symptoms and causes of chronic pain and the basics of an effective treatment and management plan. Let’s discuss what you can do NOW to help improve your situation.

Many structures are in the pelvis, underneath the bladder, bowel and uterus. All these structures can irritate each other if inflamed, enlarged, irritable or tight. Gaining improvement can be as simple as reducing irritability to just 1 of these structures, or it may require addressing all of them.

While effective treatment and management requires a multi-faceted approach, there are a number of lifestyle modifications that can be easily implemented to start reducing triggers, allowing the nerves more mobility and reducing the nervous system tension in order to directly impact the negative cycle and start increasing comfort now.

Tip # 1:

Minimise activities that tend to trigger and aggravate pudendal and perineal nerve irritation such as:

  • riding a bicycle (especially for long periods)
  • horse riding
  • jumping (for example, on a trampoline)
  • intense exercise
  • lifting weights (anything over 5 kg is too much)
  • anything that causes intense pain (if 0 is no pain and 10 is the worst pain imaginable, do not go over a pain scale of 7/10).

Tip # 2:

For any activity where you know pain comes on after a certain period of time (for example sitting for more than 5 minutes):

  • Ensure that you set an alarm and only sit for 4 minutes at any one time.
  • When the alarm goes off – get up!
    • go to the toilet or get a drink or stretch before continuing to sit
    • when sitting again, ensure the alarm is set for another 4 minutes.

Tip # 3:

Ensure you have good posture in any activities you perform for a prolonged time (more than a few minutes). Get ergonomic advice if required.

For sitting:

  • ensure that your knees sit at the same level or slightly lower than your hip joints.
  • allow your pelvis to rotate forward slightly, keeping a slight extension in your lower back – this happens naturally when your knees are lower than your hips, helping to keep the natural spinal curves.

This ensures your back is “straight” with your head sitting directly over your pelvis.

It also helps your shoulders to sit in a good position, not rounded forward or held up high towards your ears.

  • Make sure that you don’t lean on your elbows or put too much pressure on your wrists (or you will get elbow or wrist strain injuries) (it also pushes your shoulders up and tends to make you lean to one side).
  • ensure that your feet are flat on the floor (use a floor stool if required for comfort)
  • ensure the seat is cushioned a little (especially if you have pudendal nerve pain) – you can use a doughnut ring if pain is more severe.

Tip # 4:

Lie with your legs up the wall for 5-10 minutes in the evenings

  • lie on your back, on the floor with your shoulders relaxed and rotated backwards
  • get your bottom as close to the wall as possible. Adding a cushion underneath your bottom to raise the angle of your pelvis.
  • place your legs up the wall and relax (you could use a meditation or relaxation app at the same time)
  • only stay for 5 minutes initially, but if it gets painful, stop. Aim to get to 10 minutes per night.

This exercise

  • allows pain relief in the pelvic area – for vaginal issues, haemorrhoids, pudendal nerve pain, period pain and also assists with reducing pressure associated with incontinence issues
  • increases blood return to heart, therefore helps with venous return in general and varicose veins/haemorrhoids etc
  • allows the spine to relax and lengthen after a day of compression forces from standing and sitting.

Tip # 5:

Avoid straining on the toilet

  • To avoid constipation, it’s important to keep hydrated, eat healthy fruit and vegetable fibre, exercise regularly and use a natural laxative if necessary (avoid stimulant laxatives).
  • Don’t sit for extended periods as this stretches the ligaments and increases the pressure in the wrong spots increasing likelihood of pain around the buttock (inferior cluneal nerve) or haemorrhoids. If it’s not coming, stop and go for a little walk and come back when you feel more ready.
  • Aim to sit correctly on the toilet (not squat over it) as this tends to constrict rather than relax the area, increasing downward pressure and reducing ease of toileting.

Tip # 6:

Perform a relaxation and strengthening program for the pelvic floor muscles daily.

  1. Start by massaging the perineum to help relax the pelvic floor muscles, relax the nervous system and improve circulation in the area
  2. In the bathroom or a private area, use a small amount of unscented, natural oil (coconut, olive or jojoba are best)
  3. Locate the area right in the middle – between your anus and your vagina in women or base of the penis in men
  4. Use 2 fingers with the oil and gently rub that central area in a clockwise motion for 20 rotations
  5. Then gently rub in a counter clockwise motion for another 20 rotations.

Use a simplified Kegel-reverse Kegel pelvic floor exercise to help your pelvic floor re-learn to strengthen its contraction as well as relax when contraction is not needed (many issues are due to an over-tense pelvic floor).

  1. Sit or stand with good posture, feeling your head being pulled up in the centre, your shoulders relaxed and back a little, your chest “out”, your natural back curves present and not accentuated and equal pressure either through both sit bones or through the front and back of both feet.
  2. As you breathe in, allow your pelvic floor to relax – feeling that centre point (located in the previous exercise) drop, and breath in for a count of 4-5.
  3. As you breathe out, allow your pelvic floor to gently contract and pull together – feeling that centre point gently squeeze together and up towards your pelvic organs and breathe out holding that squeeze for a count of 6-7.

Tip # 7:

Alter sexual activities. Some people find that sex is painful or that afterwards, symptoms seem to worsen.

  • Always use a gentle lubricant (that works for you – jojoba oil is great)
  • Using a relaxation technique may be of benefit
  • Play around with positions to find what is most comfortable for you.

If you would like to chat about your situation, drop us an email, call, or book an appointment with Alexis.


 [JH1]Link to previous articles on website

Pelvic pain and dysfunction part 3: 7 tips to nip that pain in the butt

Pelvic pain and dysfunction part 2: The basis of management and treatment

Pelvic pain and dysfunction part 2: The basis of management and treatment

In part 1, we shared some of the causes and symptoms of pelvic dysfunction. In part 2, we discuss chronic pain (as compared to an acute condition) and why chronic pain can be so complicated to deal with effectively. It’s important to understand what’s going on in your body first, so that you can work out the steps you need to take in order to help heal yourself. It also helps you feel more confident in your approach and in the fact that improvement CAN happen, as well as give you motivation to keep going (healing has good and bad days and times when it feels like nothing is changing, then suddenly, but only after consistent action, things improve and you suddenly realise, the pain you “always” had is no longer there).

Pelvic dysfunction is a complicated subject, because:

  1. There are so many variations of pelvic dysfunctions and symptoms.
  2. There are multiple possible causes and a large number of associated factors and triggers.
  3. It’s a taboo subject so most people don’t want to talk about it.
  4. People don’t generally ask their GP or health practitioner for help for the above reason and don’t realise that there is anything that can be done to help.
  5. People don’t talk to their physical/manual therapists (such as their Osteopath, Chiropractor or Physiotherapist) as they don’t expect that lifestyle factors and muscle imbalances can be an easily treated part of the solution.

Because of these above issues, it often becomes a chronic pain condition. But what exactly is a chronic pain condition?

The definition of chronic pain is any pain that extends beyond the expected healing time for an injury. Generally, it’s accepted that most tissues have healed by 12 weeks. So, any pain that has continued for longer than 3 months is chronic pain. Conversely, acute pain is any pain condition that has resulted from a direct injury and is still within its expected tissue healing time (thus any pain less than 3 months old).

The brain is a pain modulating unit. That means that any pain stimulus, via nerves, alerts the brain to a potential issue and the brain then uses all the information it can gather before deciding if there is a problem or a potential problem and how dangerous it is. The intensity of the pain we feel is based on the brain’s interpretation of the level of injury or danger at hand. The information the brain uses to decide is vast and includes things like past experience, imminent danger in our surroundings (such as a car coming straight for you) and our fear levels.

Because of this, the brain is able to turn up or down the volume of pain you feel based on its need to keep you safe. Generally, the more threat there is to further harm, the louder the pain signals one feels. Yet, because the brain’s job is to keep us safe, it can turn down the level of pain to allow necessary action, hence the “apparent paradox” in stories you may have heard when for example a person has badly broken their leg, yet managed to walk many kilometres to get to help or run from an explosion etc.

However, when pain continues for extended periods, the wiring in the brain for that location begins to change. Just as a dirt path used over and over again gets deeper, so does the neural pathway. This means that the brain becomes hyper aware of that area of the body and is over sensitive to any nerve input that comes from that location, alerting us to potential injury, via pain, even if there is no risk.

Can you remember a time when you got a cut on your finger and it became inflamed? That area may have begun to feel painful even at the slightest touch such as the gentle swiping of fabric across it? In fact, even the adjacent finger sometimes feels painful, for no apparent reason. This is an example of sensitisation.

This is further intensified by our interpretation of the situation, such as how bad the injury is, our belief that any movement that causes pain is in fact worsening the injury and slowing or preventing healing, the level to which our injury has been affecting our daily life and functioning, and our fear that this situation will never end and might only get worse.

As you can see, the brain collects information from many places and can be influenced by many factors including our individual interpretation of what is happening to us. Thus, we feel increased pain when

  • our general levels of stress are high
  • we avoid all activities that hurt (including ones that help heal) because we believe they are damaging us
  • we fear having pain in general – because
    • it’s not nice
    • we believe that there is something wrong and we are making it worse
    • we don’t understand the biology of our situation
    • we fear that we’ll never improve and we catastrophise the worst about what that might mean for our future
    • we’re afraid that there is something seriously wrong with us.

These factors make treating chronic pain more difficult because in fact the tissues, while they may not be functioning correctly are not “damaged” anymore, so one cannot just deal with the “damaged” tissues nor just the musculoskeletal imbalances that are perpetuating the functional symptoms (such as reduced strength or movement).

Indeed effective management and treatment must therefore deal with as many of the above-mentioned types of psychological aspects as well as the physical factors. This requires education (about pain and the specific process happening in one’s own body), lifestyle modification, minimising triggers, reducing stress, increasing neural relaxation, education and techniques for learning to deal with always having pain (in some cases), rehabilitation exercises and more. Further, all of these components are unique to the individual, so body awareness, support and guidance, and some trial and error are required to build the correct plan of action. Given this complicated and individual nature of chronic pain, I hope the importance of a multi-factorial approach, starting with education and body awareness, is clear.

Once we understand the injury we have, the biology of pain and what is happening inside us, and which activities, if any, to avoid, our fear is reduced. We can also be confident in a stretching and strengthening program and doing activities that cause pain as we understand the difference between hurt and harm. This gives us control, piece of mind and discipline to continue the healing activities required to balance the tissues in the area and re-wire the brain to reduce its pain alert system. Further, we can understand the reason behind any lifestyle, habitual activity and postural modifications as well as stress reduction techniques required, making compliance easier.

Ok, so it’s complicated, where do I go for help?

 A practitioner who has some specific knowledge about pelvic pain and dysfunction is important (potentially an Osteopath, Chiropractor, Physiotherapist or even Acupuncturist – but you need to ask). A good practitioner can:

  • help you deal with the musculoskeletal imbalances and give you exercises
  • discuss and explain chronic pain with you and how you can use techniques and exercises to help re-wire your brain
  • assist with neuro-feedback, to ensure that you are using your pelvic floor correctly and give you both pelvic floor strengthening AND relaxation exercises
  • give advice on correct toileting techniques and support and training for lifestyle interventions to treat different types of incontinence issues (urge and stress)
  • assist with medicated creams, medications and referral to surgical (laser etc) interventions IF and only if necessary (generally a GP or gynaecologist – but you need to ask specifically, and I would recommend seeing a specialist gynaecologist for this type of thing as with a practitioner at Sydney’s WHRIA clinic who are researchers and leaders in this field and have minimal invasive and best results-based interventions).

If you would like to chat about your situation, drop us an email, call, or book an appointment with Alexis.

Stay tuned for part 3 where we share 7 simple tips to improve your situation NOW.


Read Part 1 now

Pelvic pain and dysfunction part 3: 7 tips to nip that pain in the butt

Pelvic pain and dysfunction part 1: Shhh we can’t talk about that!

Pelvic pain and dysfunction part 1: Shhh we can’t talk about that!

Do you suffer from:

  • incontinence (urinary or bowel)
  • urinary frequency; urgency
  • bowel or bladder irritation (with or without pain; can feel like a full sensation)
  • pain (electric shock like, shooting, aching, itching or a raw feeling) of your clitoris, vagina, labia (or penis, scrotum), urethra or perineum (space between your vagina [or scrotum] and your anus)
  • Pain around your sit bone(s) when you sit (especially for long periods)
  • Pain during sex (or afterwards)
  • Pain in your buttocks that may often or sometimes travel down your leg and foot (can be one sided or affect both legs).

Did you know that help is available?

In this three-part series, you’ll learn about the key symptoms and causes of pelvic dysfunction, pain and incontinence. We’ll touch on chronic pain and discuss the basis of an effective management and treatment program. We’ll also reveal 7 simple actions to help you take control of your health and improve your individual symptoms of pelvic pain and dysfunction.

This is a difficult and sensitive subject and often not discussed due to its private nature.

It’s important to realise that in many cases there is a lot that can be done to help – there is no need to suffer in silence!

Symptoms can be wide-ranging, and diagnosis can’t be confirmed with just one test. Instead it requires a look into your personal symptoms and a physical assessment of your pelvic structures to identify imbalances of the joints, ligaments and muscles (tightness, weakness etc) and locations where nerves can become irritated and “trapped”.

Symptoms:

Can include (but are not limited to)

  • pain in the buttocks around where you sit (sometimes in the legs and feet too)
  • sharp, electric type shooting pain around or even within the vagina in women and scrotum (or even shaft of the penis) in men
  • pain during (or after) sex
  • bladder or bowel irritation/discomfort/incontinence/frequency/urgency
  • Pain that can refer or radiate to include part of, or even the length of the leg (generally down the outside) and even go down into the bottom of the foot.

Causes:

There is no one cause, and generally multiple factors are involved

  • Pudendal nerve entrapment – including from
    • long periods of cycling
    • excessive physical exercise
    • straining (from heavy lifting or straining on the toilet)
    • stress
    • posture
    • previous pelvic or perineal trauma/injury
  • Musculoskeletal imbalances – including from
    • long periods of cycling
    • excessive physical exercise
    • straining (from heavy lifting or straining on the toilet)
    • stress
    • posture
    • previous pelvic or perineal trauma/injury
  • Neuropathic (nerve related) pain
  • Trauma – including from
    • difficult childbirth
  • gynaecological and/or colorectal surgery or issues (eg internal abdominal adhesions or uterine fibroids and the like)
  • Infection (including skin conditions).

If you’re suffering from any of the above issues, or some sort of dysfunction of the pelvic/lower abdominal area or genital region, it’s likely that an in-depth history and physical assessment plus a multi-pronged treatment approach can be of great assistance. So, talk to a primary health practitioner (pelvic physiotherapist, GP or Osteopath for example) and find out more. If the advice you receive does not seem logical or if you don’t receive the options that help you gain back control, we suggest you try another practitioner, until you get the support you need.

And remember, working with a combination of such practitioners to get an integrated and diverse treatment and home care plan is your best chance of success.

If you would like to chat about your situation, drop us an email, call, or book an appointment with Alexis.

Stay tuned for part 2, where we discuss chronic pain and its complicated nature as well as the basic idea behind effective treatment and management of pelvic pain and dysfunction.

Author: Dr Alexis Weidland(Osteopath)